Clare Boothe Luce was truly a Renaissance woman. Her remarkable career spanned seven decades and nearly as many professional interests: journalism, politics, the theatre, diplomacy, and international relations. In each of these fields, she excelled and broke new paths for women to follow. By the time of her death in 1987, she had truly become a national symbol of women's accomplishments and potential.

Clare Boothe Luce encouraged other women to achieve their own potential, but she declined to restrict her vision to the fields in which she had established her reputation. Her bequest to the Henry Luce Foundation established the Clare Boothe Luce Program, which awarded its first grants in 1989. The Clare Boothe Luce Program is intended “to encourage women to enter, study, graduate, and teach” in science, mathematics and engineering -- fields where, in our society, women continue to be underrepresented.

Creighton University is one of thirteen education institutions specifically designated in Clare Boothe Luce's will to be funded, in perpetuity, from an initial allocation. The Clare Boothe Luce Program at Creighton University funds undergraduate scholarships and graduate scholarships for women studying science or mathematics. The Program also established the Clare Boothe Luce Faculty Chair for Women in Science. There have been six Clare Boothe Luce Professors at Creighton since 1992.

For more information about the Clare Boothe Luce Program at Creighton University, please contact Mackenzie Taylor, the current Clare Boothe Luce Professor.