“In all things of nature there is something of the marvelous.” — Aristotle

Mark V. Reedy

Associate Professor
Cell and Developmental Biology

Department Chair

Ph. D. - University of California, Davis, 1998
B. S. - University of Kansas, 1992

Department of Biology
Creighton University
2500 California Plaza
Omaha, NE 68178-0103
Office: Hixson-Lied 443
Lab: Rigge Science 431
402-280-3341 (Office)
402-280-3509 (Lab)
mreedy@creighton. edu

Courses Offered

  • BIO 211 – General Biology: Molecular and Cellular
  • BIO 362 – Cell Structure and Function
  • BIO 467 – Developmental Biology (Embryology)
  • BIO 532 – Current Topics in Cellular and Molecular Biology

Research Interests

I am interested in the mechanisms that establish the final arrangement of cells and tissues during embryonic development. This phenomenon, called pattern formation, is driven by two developmental events: cell differentiation and morphogenesis. Differentiation refers to the molecular and functional diversification of cell types, whereas morphogenesis describes the physical movements that cells and tissues undergo as they assemble into their final biological forms.

I study these processes in neural crest cells. Neural crest cells detach from the embryonic brain/spinal cord and migrate extensively throughout the embryo. Ultimately, neural crest cells give rise to an astounding variety of cell types. Currently, my research focuses on the development of two subpopulations of neural crest cells: cardiac neural crest cells (which enter the developing heart and contribute to the formation of key cardiac structures) and melanoblasts (precursors to melanocytes). We use the chicken embryo as our model system because of the long historical tradition in avian neural crest research and the ability to both physically and molecularly manipulate developing chicken embryos in ovo.

Scholarly Works

Selected Publications

Heidenreich, D. J., M. V. Reedy, and P. R. Brauer. 2008. Homocysteine enhances cardiac neural crest cell attachment in vitro by increasing intracellular calcium levels. Developmental Dynamics, 237: 2117-2128.

Brauer, P. R., D. J. Heidenreich, and M. V. Reedy. 2007. Homocysteine enhances cardiac neural crest cell attachment in vitro by increasing intracellular calcium levels. Developmental Biology 306: 444-445.

Gould, D. B., M. V. Reedy, L. A. Wilson, R. A. Smith, R. L Johnson and S. W. M. John. Mutant myocilin nonsecretion in vivo is not sufficient to cause glaucoma. 2006. Molecular and Cellular Biology 26: 8427-8436.

Parichy, D. M., M. V. Reedy, and C. A. Erickson. 2006. Regulation of Melanoblast Migration and Differentiation. Chapter 5 in The Pigmentary System: Physiology and Pathophysiology, 2nd ed. J. J. Nordlund et al., eds. Oxford University Press, New York.

Cantemir, V., D. H. Cai, M. V. Reedy, and P. R. Brauer. 2004. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) expression during cardiac neural crest cell migration and its role in proMMP-2 activation. Developmental Dynamics 231: 709-719.

Tierney, B. J., T. Ho, M. V. Reedy, and P. R. Brauer. 2004. Homocysteine inhibits neural crest cell formation and morphogenesis in vivo. Developmental Dynamics 229: 63-73.

Grebenok, R. J., T. Leustek, H. Nickla, G. J. Podgorski, M. Reedy and D. L. Welker. 2004. Student Handbook for Genes VIII: Questions, Problems, and Solutions. Prentice-Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ.

Reedy, M. V., C. A. Erickson, and R. Johnson. 2003. The expression patterns of the receptor tyrosine kinase c-kit and its ligand, SCF, in chick embryos suggest unexpected roles in somite and limb development. Mechanisms of Development: Gene Expression Patterns 3: 53-58.

Cole D. G. and M. V. Reedy. 2003. Algal morphogenesis: how Volvox turns itself inside-out. Current Biology 13: R770-772.

Kim, B. S., O. V. Savinova, M. V. Reedy, Y. Lun, L. Gan, S. I Tomarev, S. W. M. John, and R. L. Johnson. 2001. Targeted disruption of myocilin (MYOC) suggests that glaucoma-causing mutations of myocilin in humans are gain of function mutations. Molecular and Cellular Biology 21: 7707-7713.

Kos, R., M. V. Reedy, R. Johnson, and C. A. Erickson. 2001. The winged helix transcription factor cFoxD3 is important for establishing the neural crest lineage and repressing melanogenesis. Development 128: 1467-1479.

Reedy, M. V., C. D. Faraco, and C. A. Erickson. 1998. The delayed entry of thoracic neural crest cells into the dorsolateral path is a consequence of the late emigration of melanogenic neural crest cells from the neural tube. Developmental Biology 200: 234-246.

Reedy, M. V., C. D. Faraco, and C. A. Erickson. 1998. Specification and migration of melanoblasts at the vagal level and in hyperpigmented Silkie chickens. Developmental Dynamics 213: 476-485.

Erickson, C. A. and M. V. Reedy. 1998. Neural crest development: the interplay between morphogenesis and cell differentiation. Current Topics in Developmental Biology 40: 178-209.

Reedy, M. V., D. M. Parichy, C. A. Erickson, K. A. Mason, and S. K. Frost-Mason. 1998. “Regulation of melanoblast migration and differentiation. ” Chapter 5 in The Pigmentary System: Physiology and Pathophysiology, 1st ed. J. J. Nordlund et al., eds. Oxford University Press, New York. pp. 75-95.